Snickersnee


Snickersnee. While this word sounds like something funny or possibly cute, it is actually referring to a long, dangerous knife. It was first used in reference to cut-and-thrust fighting in the 1700s and is still occasionally used when referencing the knife, though it is becoming more and more obsolete.

\SNIK-er-snee\

noun
1. a knife, especially one used as a weapon.
Quotes
The commander of the sloop was hurrying about and giving a world of orders, which were not very strictly attended to, one man being busy in lighting his pipe, and another in sharpening his snicker-snee.
— Washington Irving, Bracebridge Hall, 1882
Origin
Snickersnee came to English in the late 1600s from the Dutch steken meaning “to stick” and snijden meaning “to cut.”

The only photo I can find that even remotely matches this word is from Nepal.  The women in Nepal were really the toughest I have seen around the world. You meet a Nepali woman on a hike and their look alone is compelling.

10325189_10152175404343282_8976316500855130120_n

You pass them and realize what they are holding behind their back.

1017767_10152175404078282_80595978666445161_n

“blessed be
she
who is
both
furious
and
magnificent”
― Taylor Rhodes

No way we could pass without a closeup.  Though it is not long.. it is as dangerous as it looks and as you can imagine.

10308248_10152175404413282_4789108699818417401_n

I seized him by his little pig-tail,
And on his knees fell he,
As he squirmed and struggled,
And gurgled and guggled,
I drew my snickersnee!

W. S. Gilbert

dangerous: words; brave; bohotea; ron; ennenbach; Lorne; lotte

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