Pauciloquent


Pauciloquent. If you are a person of few words, then this is the term for you. It refers to someone who doesn’t say much or who, when giving a speech, gives a very short one. This is a great way for you to tell people you are a person of few words, without having to say that whole long statement. Give this a try next time and see what happens.

i-dont-always-write-with-brevity-but-when-i-do-i-make-sure-to-on

This word is NOT me.  At all.  One of my employment evaluations described me like this, “Sami is a great person, she just uses TOO many words when talking.”

My year “word” blog challenge has actually helped me figure out how to pronounce words and guess at it before i actually look it up. I guessed correctly (pas sil e quent).  Just flows off the tongue.

My sisters and I, along with my mother were the exact opposite of pauciloquent.  We were chaotic, loud, boisterous, charismatic, and whatever else.  Dad always brought a book with him when we all met up.  He couldn’t get a word in edgewise.

I think I like the word so much because it reminds me of my dad.  He was a truckdriver and I used to go on the road with him every chance I could.  We didn’t say a whole lot.  However, what we did talk about, stays with me even today.

His dad was also quite pauciloquent. Strong and silent they were. Even though they didn’t say much, every word they said, you heard.  Each word had meaning and each word made an impression.

Despite his quiet nature, he had a great sense of humor and was a super loving guy. Anyways.  I miss him and my grandpa.  As quiet as he was, he was so funny.  Yup.  Miss ya dad.

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Pauciloquent (adj) (rare)

paw-sil-o-kwent  — Uses few words in speech or conversation; laconic.

I love the way this one sounds. Mid 17th century; earliest use found in Thomas Blount (1618–1679), antiquary and lexicographer.

Example sentences

“I was trying to be friendly but he’s so pauciloquent it’s like pulling teeth.

 

I would have written a shorter letter, but I did not have the time.
Mark Twain
The more you say, the less people remember.
Francois Fenelon
 
“The secret of a good sermon is to have a good beginning and a good ending; and to have the two as close together as possible.”
― George Burns

Be Brief: Lavender; aloysius; flammeus; chitwood; brad; raven; cavershamjj; nananoyz; padrepio; tammyb; andifnotnow

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