About rfljenksy

Just a little girl in a big world. I've been saying this about myself since I joined the Navy back in 1984. Someone once asked me if I stole this quote from Marilyn Monroe. I was naive enough at the time to think that I could have come up with anything that original and said "No, I made it up." “I am good, but not an angel. I do sin, but I am not the devil. I am just a small girl in a big world trying to find someone to love.” ― Marilyn Monroe I am once again in the middle of starting a new career path. I am loving life and just want to share a few of my travel adventures with some of the people I love the most.

Snickersnee


Snickersnee. While this word sounds like something funny or possibly cute, it is actually referring to a long, dangerous knife. It was first used in reference to cut-and-thrust fighting in the 1700s and is still occasionally used when referencing the knife, though it is becoming more and more obsolete.

\SNIK-er-snee\

noun
1. a knife, especially one used as a weapon.
Quotes
The commander of the sloop was hurrying about and giving a world of orders, which were not very strictly attended to, one man being busy in lighting his pipe, and another in sharpening his snicker-snee.
— Washington Irving, Bracebridge Hall, 1882
Origin
Snickersnee came to English in the late 1600s from the Dutch steken meaning “to stick” and snijden meaning “to cut.”

The only photo I can find that even remotely matches this word is from Nepal.  The women in Nepal were really the toughest I have seen around the world. You meet a Nepali woman on a hike and their look alone is compelling.

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You pass them and realize what they are holding behind their back.

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“blessed be
she
who is
both
furious
and
magnificent”
― Taylor Rhodes

No way we could pass without a closeup.  Though it is not long.. it is as dangerous as it looks and as you can imagine.

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I seized him by his little pig-tail,
And on his knees fell he,
As he squirmed and struggled,
And gurgled and guggled,
I drew my snickersnee!

W. S. Gilbert

dangerous: words; brave; bohotea; ron; ennenbach; Lorne; lotte

Nemophilist


Nemophilist (n.) – Origin: Greek – Definition: A haunter of the woods; one who loves the forest and its beauty and solitude.

So many forests in so many countries with so many people with so little time. Park forests, mountain forests, island forests, animal forests.  I cannot say all of this better than the people I am quoting below.

“And into the forest I go to lose my mind and find my soul.”

– John Muir

“Gold is a luxury. Trees are necessities. Man can live and thrive without gold, but we cannot survive without trees.”

– Paul Bamikole

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“I found far more answers in the woods than I ever did in the city.”

– Mary Davis

“In some mysterious way woods have never seemed to me to be static things. In physical terms, I move through them; yet in metaphysical ones, they seem to move through me.”

John Fowles

“For me, trees have always been the most penetrating preachers. I revere them when they live in tribes and families, in forests and groves. And even more I revere them when they stand alone. They are like lonely persons. Not like hermits who have stolen away out of some weakness, but like great, solitary men, like Beethoven and Nietzsche. In their highest boughs the world rustles, their roots rest in infinity; but they do not lose themselves there, they struggle with all the force of their lives for one thing only: to fulfil themselves according to their own laws, to build up their own form, to represent themselves. Nothing is holier, nothing is more exemplary than a beautiful, strong tree. When a tree is cut down and reveals its naked death-wound to the sun, one can read its whole history in the luminous, inscribed disk of its trunk: in the rings of its years, its scars, all the struggle, all the suffering, all the sickness, all the happiness and prosperity stand truly written, the narrow years and the luxurious years, the attacks withstood, the storms endured. And every young farmboy knows that the hardest and noblest wood has the narrowest rings, that high on the mountains and in continuing danger the most indestructible, the strongest, the ideal trees grow.

Trees are sanctuaries. Whoever knows how to speak to them, whoever knows how to listen to them, can learn the truth. They do not preach learning and precepts, they preach, undeterred by particulars, the ancient law of life.

A tree says: A kernel is hidden in me, a spark, a thought, I am life from eternal life. The attempt and the risk that the eternal mother took with me is unique, unique the form and veins of my skin, unique the smallest play of leaves in my branches and the smallest scar on my bark. I was made to form and reveal the eternal in my smallest special detail.

A tree says: My strength is trust. I know nothing about my fathers, I know nothing about the thousand children that every year spring out of me. I live out the secret of my seed to the very end, and I care for nothing else. I trust that God is in me. I trust that my labor is holy. Out of this trust I live.

When we are stricken and cannot bear our lives any longer, then a tree has something to say to us: Be still! Be still! Look at me! Life is not easy, life is not difficult. Those are childish thoughts. Let God speak within you, and your thoughts will grow silent. You are anxious because your path leads away from mother and home. But every step and every day lead you back again to the mother. Home is neither here nor there. Home is within you, or home is nowhere at all.

A longing to wander tears my heart when I hear trees rustling in the wind at evening. If one listens to them silently for a long time, this longing reveals its kernel, its meaning. It is not so much a matter of escaping from one’s suffering, though it may seem to be so. It is a longing for home, for a memory of the mother, for new metaphors for life. It leads home. Every path leads homeward, every step is birth, every step is death, every grave is mother.

So the tree rustles in the evening, when we stand uneasy before our own childish thoughts: Trees have long thoughts, long-breathing and restful, just as they have longer lives than ours. They are wiser than we are, as long as we do not listen to them. But when we have learned how to listen to trees, then the brevity and the quickness and the childlike hastiness of our thoughts achieve an incomparable joy. Whoever has learned how to listen to trees no longer wants to be a tree. He wants to be nothing except what he is. That is home. That is happiness.”
― Herman Hesse

forest: roth; michele; mark; sustainabilitea; becky; Mason; Eddie; paula; phillip; Ingrid; cherie; cepcarol; sandy; paul; sue; rebecca

Comeuppance


Comeuppance. This is definitely a word you probably heard your grandparents use at some point and it is used in many films set in the 1920s to the 1950s or 60s. This is a fun word and it should be used more than it is. It means that someone will get what they deserve or will “get their just deserts.”

In other words . . . . Karma’s a bitch.

I believe this.  With all of my heart, I believe this.  In my own world, this has been true. I feel like I have always been the recipient of Karma.  When I do bad, I get bad.  When I do good, I get good. I do not think this is an accident. I think it is an intentional payment for my actions.

My own opinion is that if I keep juggling, then all the balls will stay in the air and my comeuppance will never come down, however richly deserved. — Mark Lawrence

It is true that on my best days I am often a hot mess.  Or at least appear to others that I am a hot mess.  My communication style is frustrating to many, both up and down the hierarchical system in which I work.  I often annoy and frustrate the people around me.  I’ve even been anonymously told that I am not respected by many of my peers.  I move too quickly for most people to actually understand what I am doing.  My mind is chaotic so my actions sometimes appear chaotic.  I am a crack up.. or cracked up.

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Even though I sometimes get my feelings hurt, I don’t look at these criticisms as completely negative attributes. My chaotic nature helps me to find great solutions.  I get things done.  I never leave things incomplete.  I do things correctly and I usually end up achieving more success than anyone ever expected.  I shoot for mediocrity and I achieve it every single time. I am sooo ok with this.

There are issues with this attitude and lifestyle for sure.  Well, where to start with the negative comeuppances that have come my way.  I am often misunderstood. Many of my bosses indicate that they never knew how hard their jobs were until I arrived.  Many colleagues, friends, and family are frustrated with my confusing communicatory delivery system.  My sense of humor can be annoying.  I have not risen as high as many of my colleagues.

I am often perceived as not caring.  Maybe it’s the fact that I often use phrases like “No, me importa!” or “मलाई मतलब छैन” or “je m’en fous” or 난 상관없어” (I don’t care)!!!

The truth is, I care deeply.  Very deeply. Just not about most of the things others care about.

The positive comeuppances for me have been that my work-life balance is awesome.  My aim for mediocrity has had me soaring through the tree limbs hardly ever impaling myself in the branches.  Though I fall often, I don’t fall far.  My crashes barely bruise me these days.  Every single downward trajectory has me finding ways to get back up.

“I long for the simplicity of theatre. I want lessons learned, comeuppances delivered, people sorted out, all before your bladder gets distractingly full. That’s what I want. What I know is what we all know, whether we’ll admit it or not: every attempt to impose the roundness of a well-made play on reality produces a disaster. Life just isn’t so, nor will it be made so.”
John M. Ford

As a matter of fact, I always get back up and live to quietly complain in my head about the naysayers and jerks.  I often believe, but am more-often proved wrong, that they too will receive every bit of comeuppance they deserve!

In the end, none of that matters, because the truth is … I am currently living in my just desserts …. and they taste just fine.   

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“If you’re really a mean person you’re going to come back as a fly and eat poop.”- Kurt Cobain

Karma: brad; Luanne; Krish; rehan; Lydia; scott; lesley; over; nightpoet; kimli; weare; swati

Eudaimonia


Eudaimonia (noun) Origin: Greek | U·de·‘mOn·E·a  The contented happy state you feel when you travel.

“It isn’t what you have or who you are or where you are or what you are doing that makes you happy or unhappy. It is what you think about it.”
― Dale Carnegie

When I travel, I am able to stop thinking about myself. I am able to remove myself from the daily grind.  All thoughts of work, stress, anxiety, irritations, etc. fly out the window.

I feel happy walking anonymously through cities and the countryside.  Watching people, talking to strangers, viewing normal folks doing normal things. 

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness.” –Mark Twain

I love imagining what they are thinking and how they got to where they are.  I love even more the realization that no matter where I am, I am no different than the people I meet are in regards to the basics of life.  

My to-do list for today:
– Count my blessings
– Practice kindness
– Let go of what I can’t control
– Listen to my heart
– Be productive yet calm
– Just breathe

These things make me happy.  These things put everything in my world back into perspective and help me balance myself. I let go of my expectations on others, but even more importantly, I let go of the expectations I have put upon myself.  Traveling is how I learn to breathe again.

“Travel isn’t always pretty. It isn’t always comfortable. Sometimes it hurts, it even breaks your heart. But that’s okay. The journey changes you; it should change you. It leaves marks on your memory, on your consciousness, on your heart, and on your body. You take something with you. Hopefully, you leave something good behind.” – Anthony Bourdain

contented travelers: tgeriatrix; salwa; aletta; sustainabilitea; sue; chris; rarasaur; nancy; woollymuses; david; coreen; cauldrons

Vagary


Vagary (n.) – Origin: Latin – Definition: An unpredictable instance, a wandering journey; a whimsical, wild or unusual idea, desire, or action.

I began to realize that life, despite moments of happiness and joy, is really about discovering priorities and dealing with unforeseen vagaries, differences, obstacles, inconveniences, and imperfections. – Maureen McCormick

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Random bike ride in Nepal.  Sometimes a random walk, or bike ride, or any non-work-related activity is what is needed to re-center your focus on what is important.  Just breathe.

“Let it rain on some days,
Let yourself shiver on some cold nights,
So when it’s Spring you’ll know why it was all worth going through.”
― Sanhita Baruah

vagaries: memadtwo; pvcannbaruah; paean; rashmi; adirondack; dale; drabble; bruce; shalini