Saudade


Saudade (noun) Origin: Portuguese | sɐw’dadə A nostalgic longing to be near again to something distant or someone that is distant.

I am nostalgic about almost every place I have ever been.  I miss the memories of the traveling I have done, of the places I have seen, of the people I have met.  I took a trip to Croatia with my youngest daughter a few years ago and it really was an amazing time.  Sure there were the mommy/daughter moments that were outrageously annoying.  However, I prefer to only remember the best parts of that trip.

I think it’s easier to remember … and to forget the annoyances of traveling with family than it is regarding issues that arise while traveling with friends. For me, it is because family has known you forever and you have your patterns and histories of the good and the bad.  For every bad there is a good.  Especially with your children.  My dream has always been to show my children the world.  Luckily for me, I have been pretty successful at that.

Though I do love traveling with friends.  There is always a feeling of saudade when my children or family are not around.  I feel like I have let them down by not having them participate in my adventure.  The re-telling is never the same as the being there.  Also, there is a freedom of being able to comfortably be at your best, your worst, your goofiest, your happiest, and even your saddest.  I am looking forward to more travels with them, more memories with them, and really, just being nearer to them.

“That strange sense of being different stays with you. You long to be with people who are more like you. Similarities are what bonds humans than differences, Beevitha.”
― Husna Mohammad

Saudade:  Irina; Iamfierce; candk; seeking; julia; zeki; simon; Asakura; agogo; chronosfer;

Day 18 ~ Dear Past, Thank you for … Smiles


“Memories of childhood were the dreams that stayed with you after you woke.”
~Julian Barnes

Every time I start to feel down about myself, all I have to do is pull out a few of my favorite growing up photos and I can’t help myself but to smile.  How could you not.  Look at that half-crazed, maniacal-looking, happy child.

OK.. well.. not this one.  Apparently 1967 or 1968 (can you read the date on this picture?) was not my year (Little Sami, the smallest child on dad’s lap).

“Don’t you wish you could take a single childhood memory and blow it up into a bubble and live inside it forever?”
~Sarah Addison Allen

ahh here we go… just smile… be nice and … just smile

“When I was a kid, I imagined flying holding balloons”
~Luffina Lourduraj

girl; flowers; Alison; Janis; purple; Roshni; moondustwriter; Jane; tanaya

Finding a routine in Lagos – Part 1


“The human spirit lives on creativity and dies in conformity and routine.”
― Vilayat Inayat Khan

Well, nearly 4 months in and still trying to find that routine.  The quote above exemplifies though that my routine is not about conformity but about discovery and experiences.  Lucky me, I found and joined a group that will allow me the opportunity to create a routine of discovery.

The Nigerian Field Society (NFS) is a national organization founded in 1930 with branches in several cities across the country which depend entirely on local interest and volunteer commitment. The first edition of NFS’s publication, “The Nigerian Field”, was published in 1931. This journal still continues and is one Nigeria’s oldest continuous publications. For more information go to http://www.nigerianfield.org/.

I just completed my first trip with them to Makoko, the stilt village.  I was able to visit this community of about 100,000 people and experience what their daily life is really like.  At least as much as one can in a single tour.

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This village was initially established as a fishing village in the 18th century and has been referred to as the Venice of Africa.  From the A-frame school house I was able to interact with some of the children and was also given the best overall view from the 3rd floor of this structure at the immenseness of this”village”.  Mouth-dropping really to see how expansive this stilt city was.  To think that there were over 100,000 people living here.  Out of the 100,000 people, we were informed that only about 350 were lucky enough to go to school.

For the children who were not in school, they would help transport food through the village, learn to fish, do a multitude of other tasks, or simply hang out and play.

It was amazing to see this completely different side of Lagos.  You can see a very interesting article from CNN world that gives you more details of this village.  Postcards from home: documenting Nigeria’s floating community

A trip to the stilt village was added by another member of this tour group.  The video gives you a slightly different image with sound perspective.  I hope you enjoy.

Other routines you might find interesting.

Favorite faces Favorite places


“For a moment at least, be a smile on someone else’s face.” 
― Dejan Stojanovic, The Sun Watches the Sun

Faces are really beautiful to me.

Nigerian Faces I loved

What do you think is the world’s most recognisable container of information? It’s the human face. We are constantly reading each other and responding.

Jan Chipchase

Faces I loved in Nepal

Who sees the human face correctly: the photographer, the mirror, or the painter?

Pablo Picasso

Beautiful faces in Venezuela

There’s nothing more interesting than the landscape of the human face.

Irvin Kershner

Beautiful and crazy faces in Korea

 

Other posts on faces from Where’s My Backpack

Figments, Middleton, Food Face, Elizabeth, Cee, A frog, Le Drake, Oh danny Boy, Quotidian, Lady Lee, Woolley, Tanzania, Sue Judd, Elizabeth, Mecyme, Regional