Hireath


Hireath (noun) Origin: Welsh | HEER-eyeth A homesickness for a home to which you cannot return, a home which maybe never was.

Home is wherever I hang my hat.  ~~Miriam Margolyes

It’s so funny to me.  I only lived there for three years out of the fifty-five I have under my belt.  It was my home for such a very short time.  It’s not that I cannot return to it, it is not that it never was my home.  It was.  I knew it was not really my forever home. It did feel sometimes that I had been there forever.

Those days and times, they were so vivid.  I sometimes dream of going back there and living forever.  I sometimes have dreams I am, in fact, there.  I wake up and feel a homesickness like that of when I am missing my native home.  The people.  The food.  The friends. The hikes. The smells, tastes, and sounds.

I have lived in many other places and have loved most of them.  However, this is the place I feel most tied to and one day … I am sure I will go back.

“Rhys absorbed that with chagrin. “No one has ever accused me of being a romantic,” he said ruefully.
“If you were, how would you propose?”
He thought for a moment. “I would begin by teaching you a Welsh word. Hiraeth There’s no equivalent in English.”
“Hiraeth,” she repeated, trying to pronounce it with a tapped R, as he had.
“Aye. It’s a longing for something that was lost, or never existed. You feel it for a person or a place, or a time in your life…it’s a sadness of the soul. Hiraeth calls to a Welshman even when he’s closest to happiness, reminding him that he’s incomplete.”
Her brow knit with concern. “Do you feel that way?”
“Since the day I was born.” He looked down into her small, lovely face. “But not when I’m with you. That’s why I want to marry you.”
― Lisa Kleypas, Marrying Winterborne

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The ache for home lives in all of us, the safe place where we can go as we are and not be questioned. ~~ Maya Angelou

“Do you know that high fever which invades us in our cold suffering, that aching for a land we do not know, that anguish of curiosity? There is a country which resembles you, where everything is beautiful, sumptuous, authentic, still, where fantasy has built and adorned a western China, where life is sweet to breathe, where happiness is wed to silence. That is where to live, that is where to die!”

– Invitation to a Voyage”
― Charles Baudelaire, Paris Spleen and Wine and Hashish

Hireath- defjawthepoet; treenewt; jaydixit; creativeworms; Taste; beleagured; word association; adamisler; late night thoughts; Place of the living; Hiraeth — It’s Not That Hard to Say; Home; coffeetalks; lifeinthewronglane; Homesick for an Old Friend

Wabbit


“I’m so good at sleeping that I can do it with my eyes closed.” — Anonymous

Wabbit. No, this isn’t referring to a wascally wabbit. It is a Scottish term for being exhausted. Next time you’re tired, try saying, “I’m pretty wabbit at the moment” and see just how many people look at you strange.

“I love sleep. My life has the tendency to fall apart when I’m awake, you know?”
― Ernest Hemingway

Perfect word for today!  It is true that I have always gone to bed early and I always wake up early.  Some stories my dad has told about me was that I was the easiest kid to take care of at bedtime.  Never fought going to bed.  This is a permanent part of my personality.

Last night I went to bed about 8:30 pm.  Yes, I usually go to bed this early.  I lay there for a bit and read or listen to some music.  However, I woke up at midnight and could not fall back asleep until about 3:30 am.  I got up and drank some sleepy-time tea, had a little snack, read a little.  Nothing worked.  I could not fall back asleep.  This is an anomaly for me.

I love a good night’s sleep because I wake up feeling so much better.  Everything from the day before has been washed away and I always feel like I have a fresh start to either continue with whatever I started or completely start over and just leave the messy day behind. So today, this was the best word inspiration I could have had. Enjoy!!

“Dear sleep, I’m sorry we broke up this morning. I want you back!” — Anonymous

“I already want to take a nap tomorrow.” — Anonymous

“I love to sleep. Do you? Isn’t it great? It really is the best of both worlds. You get to be alive and unconscious.” — Rita Rudner

“Each night, when I go to sleep, I die. And the next morning, when I wake up, I am reborn.”
― Mahatma Gandhi

“Your eyes water when you yawn because you miss your bed and it makes you sad.” — Anonymous

“Happiness is waking up, looking at the clock and finding that you still have two hours left to sleep.” — Charles M. Schulz

“People say, ‘I’m going to sleep now,’ as if it were nothing. But it’s really a bizarre activity. ‘For the next several hours, while the sun is gone, I’m going to become unconscious, temporarily losing command over everything I know and understand. When the sun returns, I will resume my life.’

If you didn’t know what sleep was, and you had only seen it in a science fiction movie, you would think it was weird and tell all your friends about the movie you’d seen.

They had these people, you know? And they would walk around all day and be OK? And then, once a day, usually after dark, they would lie down on these special platforms and become unconscious. They would stop functioning almost completely, except deep in their minds they would have adventures and experiences that were completely impossible in real life. As they lay there, completely vulnerable to their enemies, their only movements were to occasionally shift from one position to another; or, if one of the ‘mind adventures’ got too real, they would sit up and scream and be glad they weren’t unconscious anymore. Then they would drink a lot of coffee.’

So, next time you see someone sleeping, make believe you’re in a science fiction movie. And whisper, ‘The creature is regenerating itself.”
― George Carlin

Sweet dreams:  kait; gail; raung; elena; neihtn; pensitivity; aaysid; masgautsen; caramel; Jane

Eudaimonia


Eudaimonia (noun) Origin: Greek | U·de·‘mOn·E·a  The contented happy state you feel when you travel.

“It isn’t what you have or who you are or where you are or what you are doing that makes you happy or unhappy. It is what you think about it.”
― Dale Carnegie

When I travel, I am able to stop thinking about myself. I am able to remove myself from the daily grind.  All thoughts of work, stress, anxiety, irritations, etc. fly out the window.

I feel happy walking anonymously through cities and the countryside.  Watching people, talking to strangers, viewing normal folks doing normal things. 

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness.” –Mark Twain

I love imagining what they are thinking and how they got to where they are.  I love even more the realization that no matter where I am, I am no different than the people I meet are in regards to the basics of life.  

My to-do list for today:
– Count my blessings
– Practice kindness
– Let go of what I can’t control
– Listen to my heart
– Be productive yet calm
– Just breathe

These things make me happy.  These things put everything in my world back into perspective and help me balance myself. I let go of my expectations on others, but even more importantly, I let go of the expectations I have put upon myself.  Traveling is how I learn to breathe again.

“Travel isn’t always pretty. It isn’t always comfortable. Sometimes it hurts, it even breaks your heart. But that’s okay. The journey changes you; it should change you. It leaves marks on your memory, on your consciousness, on your heart, and on your body. You take something with you. Hopefully, you leave something good behind.” – Anthony Bourdain

contented travelers: tgeriatrix; salwa; aletta; sustainabilitea; sue; chris; rarasaur; nancy; woollymuses; david; coreen; cauldrons

Wabi-Sabi


Wabi-Sabi (noun) Origin: Japanese | The discovery of beauty within the imperfections of life and art.

This yet another Japanese aesthetic that has a very deep meaning in which life and art are viewed as beautiful not because they are perfect and eternal but because they are imperfect and fleeting.

We experience happiness as a series of pleasing moments. They come and go like clouds, unpredictable, fleeting, and without responsibility to our desires. Through honest self-work, reflection, and meditation, we begin to string more of these moments together, creating a web-like design of happiness that drapes around our lives. Tara Stiles

Every time I go home I find that everything has changed.  I mean some of the things are the same, but for the most part, it is all different.  Like in my brain that one laugh, that one smile, that one experience remains, but all of the emotions have changed.  It’s like starting over each time. Sometimes that makes me happy and sometimes that makes me sad. I try to hold on to the happy and ignore the sad.  However, it’s possible that the sadness and the anger and the misunderstandings help you to realize how fleeting the happy times are and how you should be holding on to them even tighter. These happy times are exactly the wabi-sabi that makes it all so beautiful.  That in the end, makes it all so very beautiful.

I get those fleeting, beautiful moments of inner peace and stillness – and then the other 23 hours and 45 minutes of the day, I’m a human trying to make it through in this world. Ellen DeGeneres

fleeting: Albatz; Tina; philos; ana; yamoto; xanbarbara; swati; penross; barbara; chris; mugdha

Sprachgefühl


Sprachgefühl (noun) Origin: German | A person who has the feel for a language.

This literally translates as ‘language feeling’ from compound nouns combining Sprache (language) and Gefühl (feeling). Basically, this does not only refer to a person who has a good understanding of foreign languages but also to a person who has intuitiveness for what is linguistically appropriate.

The truth is, I have no real understanding of foreign languages.  I do have a good understanding and am very intuitive to what people are saying, meaning, or wanting though. I’m perceptive to the needs of others.  Not always accommodating but very perceptive to what they want or need.

I have taken both Spanish and Nepali courses for work.  Nepali was easier for me because it was completely not logical and did not even use the U.S. alphabet but an easier form of Hindi.  I was also able to learn the Korean alphabet when I was in Korea. However, the Spanish language was and continues to be a struggle for me.  There is something about learning a very hard language that makes the teachers a little more forgiving and makes the learning more memorable.  

As you can see, I was a very diligent student.  However, few of the measures I took helped me learn the language.  I just do not have a mind for this type of thing.  I enjoyed the role playing, the music, the movies and I could always get the gist.  But the memorizing of nonsensical words in nonsensical sentences didn’t help me at all.  It was exhausting.

After 7 months of Spanish, a few weeks in Ecuador in a language program, and many folks doing their best to help me out, I was still confusing past, present, future, imperative, gender, words in general.  I think because Spanish is everywhere and you can make out so many of the words, i felt it would be so much easier.

For me it was not.  I cannot tell you how many times I would be telling someone a story about my childhood in Spanish, and the person would look at me and say, “Wait, me?  Wait, you?  Wait, who are you talking about?”  My feelings were that if you did not understand me completely, you should at least understand if you or I had done something.. work it out man.  When i tell you a story about being attacked by a seal…. do you really have to ask “who” was attacked by a seal? I mean, unless you were actually attacked by a seal then yes, that is a great question.  Anyways.  

Once I completed my language classes, I completely enjoyed every country I visited.  I loved being able to even partially communicate in any of the languages of the countries I visited.  It completely changed the travel experience. 

Also, even though I did not quite know all the words, I was able to tell jokes, laugh at jokes, sing along, and carry on broken conversations with just about anyone. I think that having a “feel” for a language is sometimes more important than to be able to speak it perfectly.  Sadly my bosses do not always agree with my philosophy .. and sure they are at least partly right.  I do know that I had fun and I do know that people had fun with me and sometimes at my expense for my communication errors.  In my world, that means total success.

I have been to many countries at this point and in many of the countries I never spoke the language at all.  I think if you looked at all of the pictures below, you would not be able to know which countries I understood and spoke the languages and which ones I did not.  For me, the understanding came with the smiles.  It came with laughing over common states of being.  It came from eating and drinking the same food and realizing that we all had some of the same joys and some of the same sadnesses. 

I am definitely classifiable as a Sprachgefühl … if that is even a classifiable state of being.  See, not even sure if this is a real word, but you feel me, right?

what does the dog say?   Rochelle; Ibonoco; varnika; Rosie; Troy; Debasis; Jim; Rebecca; helen; annette; libertatemamo; albigensia; Cherie; suzanne