Un Poema para mi papa


I wrote this poem in English previously.. but am looking for Spanish speakers to provide feedback on my translation.

 

Un poema para mi papa

Aquí estás hace tanto mucho tiempo.  ¿A dónde fue el tiempo da da daddio? ¿Cuáles fueron tus sueños, tus miedos, tus esperanzas? ¿Tus expectativas.. tus sí´s y tus no´s?  Tan difícil de creer… eras tú. ¡Sin embargo, me dijiste hace unas docenas de años que sentías que aún eras tú!  Pero cuando te miraste al espejo, no podías creer lo que viste.  Te preguntaste mientras mirabas fijamente, ¨ ¿Quién demonios es ese viejo?¨  Me reí de eso.  Aunque entendí completamente.  Ahora, unas pocas docenas de años después… Me pregunto, ¿Dónde fue el tiempo da da daddio?

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Aquí estás en el flujo medio. ¿A dónde estuvo el tiempo da da daddio? Encontraste tu verdadero amor.  Te mantuviste firme y verdadero. Trabajaste como un perro y nos viste a través de todo.  Éramos tan jóvenes … nos viste crecer y los eres queridos se fueron y aún así te balanceaste y rodaste.  A través de los nacimientos… el trabajo .. las alegrías.. los dolores .. los dolores en los traseros … los tiempos rápidos … los tiempos lentos … las graduaciones .. las separaciones .. los nietos … la vida en el medio .. mira cómo va .. y sigue .. y vamos. ¿Qué extrañamos? ¿Cómo podríamos saberlo? Qué rápido pasaría el tiempo como un río furioso.  Como un pájaro … el tiempo, vuela … lejos .. más o menos se fue volando.  ¿Cómo podríamos saberlo? ¿A dónde fue el tiempo da da daddio?

Aquí no estás hace tanto tiempo … ¿A dónde fue el tiempo da da daddio? Perdiste tu verdadero amor y ahora estás solo.  Nos preguntamos cómo le iría para a usted mismo.  ¿Qué harías? ¿Cómo podrías ser solo uno … solo uno? ¿Un acto en solitario?  Pero seguiste e hiciste nuevos amigos. Tomaste muchas vacaciones … viajaste … se réiste y viviste.  Hubo tiempos bajos.. pero ninguno demasiado bajo.  Hubo tiempos altos .. pero ninguno demasiado alto.  ¿A dónde fue el tiempo da da daddio?

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¡Oye, oye, oye da da daddio!  El tiempo aún pasaba y la vida aún fluía. Oye, esos años… ¿A dónde fueron? ¡¡¡Dime, dime da da daddio!!! Una estrella que se levanta una puesta del sol.  La luna baila .. bodas.. mujeres persiquiéndote como el soltero más elegible del lugar.  Pasaron un millón de horas y disfrutaste cada una de ellas.  Pasó más tiempo y pasó más tiempo y pasó más tiempo.  Vivo muy lejos pero cada vez que regreso a casa.. es lo mismo … pero muy diferente .. ¿A dónde va el tiempo da da daddio?

Tienes casi 80 años .. no eres tan viejo .. me digo a mí mismo … y aun así lo sé … llega un momento en que todos debemos irnos .. pero todavía estás aquí por ahora y así .. mi corazpon se aprieta.  Mis ojos fluyen … qué demonios saben los médicos …

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Aquí no estábamos hace tanto tiempo … ¿A dónde fue el tiempo da da daddio?

 

¨Sonrío porque eres mi padre.  Me río porque no hay nada que puedas hacer al respecto. ¨ ‘ Desconocido

 

Dad – Behind every great daughter is a truly amazing dad


My last post about my dad was back in June.  I just went back and read it about 3 times.  Loved looking at the photos and remembering him how he was.  He has always been the most influential man in my life.  He lifted my self-esteem (Sami, you are my favorite!). He helped me grow great work ethics (It’s better to do a job right the first time then have to re-do the job) and a superb ability to out stubborn anyone (Sami, always admit when you are wrong, but if you are right, never back down).  He developed in me a crazy ability to laugh at my own jokes, even if no one else did and to tell really, really terrible jokes (Little Johnny was in the classroom and had to go to the bathroom, he raised his hand and said…).

I am who I am because of him.

My Daddy was my hero. He was always there for me when I needed him. He listened to me and taught me so many things. But most of all he was fun.
—Bindi Irwin

No worries, he’s still here.  But he’s aging, getting sick, being hospitalized, getting out, continuing on with his crazy life, going a little crazy at times, getting sick again, acting like a child, getting old, and just moving through life faster than I want him to.

Years ago he said to me as we were sitting in a dive bar in Spokane, “Sami, you see that young man walking through that door? How old do you think he is?” I looked at the young man walking in the bar and said, “Well he’s at least 21!”  Dad said, “Yeah, at least 21!  That’s how I see myself when I think of myself.  Then I walk by a mirror and I think….who is that old man looking back at me.  I can’t imagine it’s me.  I never feel that way.  I can’t imagine it’s me.  I really can’t”

We both sort of laughed about it and moved on with our lives.  Fast forward about 20 years.  I feel what he felt sometimes.  But I feel it more when i look at him now.  Especially being so far away from him.

When I was working in Nepal, I had just gone through the earthquake and so was a little shattered and scattered and I happened to call him up.  He didn’t sound like himself at all.  I was convinced he had had a minor stroke.  I rushed home as quickly as I could.. which is a feat.. let me tell you.  The folks I worked for were super amazing and supported me through this emotional roller coaster.  I arrived back in Spokane and for the most part it seemed like all was well and I had panicked for no reason at all.  Except, every once in a while, he would sort of tear up.  Right before I was due to leave for my next assignment, I met up with him and he looked ecstatic.  I asked him why he was so darn happy all of a sudden.  He told me he had received GREAT news from the doctor.. all of his tests came back clean and he was as healthy as an old horse like him could be.  So, apparently there had been a reason for me to sort of panic.  Dads.. what are you gonna do.

Well, about 3 good years later and here we go again.  A few weeks ago, I got a call from my sister.  She said, “Dad’s been in the hospital with heart and kidney problems.  He also has pneumonia.  Apparently he had been in an auto accident several  weeks ago and didn’t tell anyone.”  He checked himself out of the hospital because he didn’t want to stay there. Wouldn’t follow any of the doctor’s recommendations and was being a pain in the butt to everyone.  She flew to Arizona and worked him through his situation and attitude. Got his meds worked out and sent some pictures to help my other sister and i get emotionally prepared for whatever might happen.

Snidely Whiplash

This is a little doohickey dad found in a parking lot. Snidely rode with my dad for nearly 40 years when he was a truck driver. I began using it as a “keep dad safe” lucky charm.

Over the course of the past few weeks, my sis has been going from Washington to Arizona to check in on him, get him set up with doctors, physical therapy.  I’m not sure what I would have done, or how I would have handled it without her.  It’s been super stressful and emotional.  It’s so weird to see him in this position.  It breaks my heart.

When I think of him that is now how I see him.  I can’t imagine it’s him.  In my minds eye and in my heart, that’s not how I see him.  Then I look at these pictures or see him in person and I think….who is that old man looking back at me.  I can’t imagine it’s him.  I really can’t.

Then, as I was writing this blog, literally just now, my sister sent me the below messages and photos.

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I catch my breath and in my head say, “Thank you!!” Because now, for a minute at least,  I can imagine him .. how I think of him ..

Old as she was, she still missed her daddy sometimes.
—Gloria Naylor

 

Happy Papa Day


Anyone can be a father, but it takes someone special to be a dad, and that’s why I call you dad, because you are so special to me. You taught me the game and you taught me how to play it right. Wade Boggs

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When I was about 26, I found out the dad I grew up with was not my biological father.  Everyone thought I would freak out.  They freaked out.  Every single person in my family seemed to know this already.  Unbeknownst to me, I had so many people trying to solve this 26 year long mystery for me. They spent months trying to get to the bottom of it.

What they did not know is that I WAS shocked.  But not in the way they might have realized.  I was shocked that everyone in my family had kept a secret for 26 years.  My family has never been good at not blathering on about everything, every place and everyone they knew.  I WAS freaking out.. but only because I thought it would be so cool to have more siblings. I always wanted to come from a gigantic family.  Think Partridge Family or Brady Bunch.. I could start a band or..uh.. travel across the states and get into ridiculous escapades..well maybe not.. but I thought it would be cool.

More than anything I was amazed.  Amazed that the dad I grew up with, knew he was not my biological father and wanted to keep that a secret from me in order to avoid hurting me.  I never doubted for a second that he loved each of us deeply and without pause and as his own children.

He used to tell me I was his favorite.  I had his sense of humor, his walk, his work ethics.  I worshipped him.  I still do.  He was a steady beacon of light on the shore of a wild sea of women.  He was dependable, funny, and strong.  He was my dad, my papa, the man to whom all other men would need to aspire to win my heart.  I love you dad!!

Without my dad, I wouldn’t be here. Maria Sharapova

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My Dad is my hero. Harry Connick, Jr.