Ecophobia


Ecophobia (noun) Origin: English/Ancient Greek | A fear or dislike of one’s home.

— and so you leave, to find where home is for you. *wink*

This word is based from Ancient Greek in whick ‘eco’ is derived from oîkos or “house”, and then of course ‘phobia’ from phóbos or “fear”.

I do not fear or dislike my home.  I have loved every home I have ever lived in.  My fear is that I may not ever find just one home I prefer over another.

“We travel, some of us forever, to seek other places, other lives, other souls.” – Anais Nin

My dislike is related to not being content to reside in just one place.  One place forever scares me.

“The gladdest moment in human life, methinks, is a departure into unknown lands.” – Sir Richard Burton

Every time I look out my window I see possibilities.  Every time I walk down new streets, I feel reborn.  Even when I am homesick and I go back to my home town, I end up missing .. the feeling of missing my home.

“Travel isn’t always pretty. It isn’t always comfortable. Sometimes it hurts, it even breaks your heart. But that’s okay. The journey changes you; it should change you. It leaves marks on your memory, on your consciousness, on your heart, and on your body. You take something with you. Hopefully, you leave something good behind.” – Anthony Bourdain

“I am not the same, having seen the moon shine on the other side of the world.” – Mary Anne Radmacher

The world: Salwa; Debbie; Ben; Isaac; Jackson; Peopletrip; bereaved; tgeriatrix; woollymuses; Amy; Tina; restlessJo; Kritika

Photophile


Photophile (noun) Origin: Dictionary of Obscure of Sorrows | A person who loves photography.

This is an obscure word but supposedly, this came about after deriving it off from the word “photophilic” which is an organism that loves or seeks light — which is related in a way to how cameras function.

“Photography is the story I fail to put into words.”
— Destin Sparks

The magic of photography.  I have always loved photographs.  The ones I have taken, as well as the ones others have taken.  They move me.  I can find a story in every photo.

“In photography there is a reality so subtle that it becomes more real than reality.”
— Alfred Stieglitz

I believe that we take it all for granted.  I think those of us who love photographs sometimes forget there are people around the world who have never seen themselves in a picture.  Taking instantly shareable pictures has been an amazing opportunity to share some of my favorite photos with the people who inspired the picture.

“A thing that you see in my pictures is that I was not afraid to fall in love with these people.”
— Annie Leibovitz

Nepal was really the best place to do this.  People loved having their pictures taken and then looking at the pictures. It was also a really cool place just for the photo itself.  A super magical place to see, share, and re-see.

Photophile: Helen; Casual; Nicole; Henry; James; Susie; Leanne; Kenneth; Keith; Akash; Levi; 35mmc; Owl; Lisa

Onism


Onism (noun) Origin: Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows | The awareness of how little of the world you will experience.

“The frustration of being stuck in just one body, that inhabits only one place at a time, which is like standing in front of the departures screen at an airport, flickering over with strange city names like other people’s passwords, each representing one more thing you’ll never get to see before you die.”

ETYMOLOGY: Portmanteau of monism (the philosophical view that a variety of things can be explained in terms of a single reality) + onanism (alternative word for self-pleasure).

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Taking a picture of folks on a bus and feeling a little sad that I am not on that bus because they appear to be having so much fun.  Even when I am enjoying exactly where I am and what I am doing.

Being ok with where I currently am (Malabo), but wistfully wishing I was back where I was (Croatia here). So magical.  Sort of the grass is always greener attitude, which I hate.

“I looked through others’ windows
On an enchanted earth
But out of my own window–
solitude and dearth.

And yet there is a mystery
I cannot understand–
That others through my window
See an enchanted land.”
― Jessie B. Rittenhouse’

Greener grasses:  SMB; J-DUB; Planetmom; Brittnjess; Sarah; herman; Liv; meatnpotatoes; Joyce; KG; bratty; ninjawhales; Lyna; Brendan

Schwellenangst


Schwellenangst (noun) Origin: German | Fear of crossing a threshold to embark on something new.

ETYMOLOGY: From the German words Schwelle (threshold) + Angst (anxiety).

My dad passed in October and when I saw this word, it brought me back to his passing.  It still causes angst in my heart along with the realization that I have embarked on a new journey.  A journey that will no longer include my father or my mother.

In the U.S. death is viewed with angst, with fear, with trepidation, with not many positive words.  All of these words are true, but more for the living than for the dying.  Even the word passed is a euphemism that makes you think that the threshold is just something you walk through which makes the actual event that much more traumatic (for the living).  Watching someone die is traumatic. Devastating.

The word also brought me back to my time in Nepal.  In Nepal bodies are generally cremated.  They are carried through the street (also generally) and brought to the sacred area where folks sit on one side of a river and 5-9 bodies would be laid to rest on the other side of the river and publicly and openly cremated.  Families would gather on the other side of the river and watch the events.  There would often be food and drink shared and people would come and go from the cremation area.  Anyone could stand and watch or pass through this area.  At first it was super odd to watch but also fascinating.   Kids were playing nearby, monkeys begging for snacks, old people staring into the distance.  Who knows what they were contemplating.  There was sadness of course, but it was an expected event.  Everyone lives and everyone dies.

I actually found it reassuring.  Crossing the threshold is inevitable.  The end is not necessarily the most important part of the journey.  In Nepal, it was a reminder that we are all eventually smoke and ash.  The trick for me is not to be smoke and ash during the years I am passing through right now.  Here’s to the threshold!  Enjoy.

“Life itself means to separate and to be reunited, to change form and condition, to die and to be reborn. It is to act and to cease, to wait and to rest, and then to begin acting again, but in a different way. And there are always new thresholds to cross: the threshold of summer and winter, of season or a year, of a month of a night; the thresholds of birth, adolescence, maturity and old age; the threshold of death and that of the afterlife — for those who believe in it.”
― Arnold van Gennep

Threshold:  Thoughts; Hobbo; blindzanygirl; victoria; purplerays; strangers; heart; compassandcamera; beth; dale; brand; maedharanael; ben; tom; overthinking; shayan; swabby; Yinglan; Ramblings

Komorebi


Komorebi (noun) Origin: Japanese | The sunlight that filters through the trees.

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During my time in Nepal, I was able to visit an elephant rescue sanctuary.  There were parts of this place that were stunning.  It was amazing to be so close to such massive and gentle beasts.  The surroundings were magical with the the sun lightly shining through the trees.

However, in the end, I was not in love with the place or the concept of this particular reserve. As I looked at these majestic animals, at each part of the animal, I became a little sad.  A baby separated from its mother, sad eyes, chains.  So many tourists. Myself included.

I promised myself I would not participate in this type of tour again.  I support animal rescue efforts.  However, this one left me feeling a little empty.  One day I would love to participate in a tour that allows me to visit elephants when they are roaming free and in their natural habitat.

A prayer for the wild at heart kept in cages.
― Tennessee Williams

The truth is I love being alive. And I love feeling free. So if I can’t have those things then I feel like a caged animal and I’d rather not be in a cage. I’d rather be dead. And it’s real simple. And I think it’s not that uncommon. – Angelina Jolie

Ava; Philosophy; Shivani; Goff; tasview; redcat; Pat; candice; Mike